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            History - Economics - Political Science  

  • History
  • Economics
  • Political Science

History and Classics

Courses

Western Civilization: An Introduction (300-910-AB)

The roots of western civilization in Mesopotamia and Egypt are examined. Our Greek and Roman heritage, Christianity, barbarian invasions, the fall of the Roman Empire and the first great, uniquely European civilization which took shape during the Middle Ages are also covered. The course emphasizes the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Age of Discovery, Enlightenment, French Revolution, Industrialization, Nationalism and the Age of Imperialism.

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History of Canada and the World ( 330-250-AB)

This course will allow the student to better understand their world through an examination of Canadian history and Canada’s relationship to the rest of the world. We will examine facets of the social, cultural, economic and political history of Canada from the period of the first European explorers up to the end of the twentieth century. Within this time period we will study Canada’s role in a rapidly changing world. The following topics will be covered: early European exploration, colonialisation, native American society and early relations with the Europeans, New France, British North America, Confederation, building a Nation, World War One, the Winnipeg General Strike, the Great Depression, World War Two, Canada and the Cold War, the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, Quebec Separatism, Canada’s role in International A ffairs, and American-Canadian relations.

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History of the United States (330-251AB)

This course covers the colonization of America and the founding of the American republic. The following topics are examined: development of American institutions, slavery, Civil War, construction, western expansion, World War I, “Return to Normalcy”, the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War, civil rights and Vietnam.

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Modern History: Twentieth Century International Relations (330-252-AB)

This course covers the following topics: World War I and the Treaty of Versailles; post-war tensions and economic problems in the l920’s; Stalinism in Communist Russia; failure of the Weimar Republic in Germany; the Great Depression and the rise of Totalitarianism; Mussolini and Fascism in Italy; Hitler and Nazism in Germany; failure of the League of Nations and outbreak of World War II; aftermath of World War II; the Cold War, United Nations and the superpowers; emergence of the Third World and Communist China; threats to world peace and the nuclear age – Korea, Vietnam, the Middle East and the breakup of the Communist world.

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History of the Developing World: The Third World (330-252-AB)

This course explores definitions such as Third World, colonies, colonialism, imperialism, under-evelopment, development, neo-colonialism, unequal trade, North-South relations, European expansion from the 15th to 20th centuries and division of the world. Case studies on Latin America, India, Africa, Asia and the Middle East are used to look at the rise of nationalism, Independence and liberation. Ideas, movements and leaders are also course themes.

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Lost Civilizations (330-254-AB)

This course is a survey of basic techniques used by archaeologists to uncover information about ancient societies. The course surveys several such societies (Classical Mayan, Mesopotamia,  ronze Age Crete and Ancient Egypt) from the point of view of archaeology; what is known; how was the knowledge derived; what are the issues still unknown or in contention.

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Introduction to Classics (332-100-AB)

This course primarily deals with the history of the Classical Age in the Mediterranean world, and the civilization of the Greek and Roman worlds between 500 BC and 500 AD. Background will be given of aspects of the Paleolithic and Neolithic Ages which were essential to the rise of civilized societies and important pre-Greek civilizations (Sumeria, Egypt, Minoans, et al.) of the Bronze and early Iron Ages. This course meets the first level compulsory course requirement for Social Science. 

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Ancient Greece From Troy to Alexander: A History of Sparta (330-255-AB)

This course studies the history of ancient Sparta from its legendary origins until the Roman Empire.  Analysis involves the examination of the historical events that shaped Sparta, as well as in-depth studies of Spartan civilisation from political, geographic, economic, religious, and cultural standpoints.  Finally, the module looks at the reception of Spartan history in the twentieth century.

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Ancient Rome: Republic to Empire (330-256-AB)

The decades before the fall of the Roman Republic are characterised by political violence, civil war, and the rise of military strongmen. The period, from the rise of the brothers Gracchus in the 130s BC to the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44, is one of tumultuous political change, and throughout much of this time we are blessed with the writings of Rome’s preeminent lawyer and orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero. Intellectual, gifted, honest, vain, insecure, and short-sighted are all adjectives that have been used to describe Cicero and his career. His works present insights, sometimes personal, sometimes propaganda, that allow us to examine this period in far greater detail than we can most. We shall consider the significance of oratory and the writing of history in the late Republic, and the importance of military leaders such as Caesar and Pompey. At the conclusion of this course, students should have a greater understanding of the internal problems that revealed the shortcomings of Republican government, and how these eventually led to the Republic’s fall and to the rise of the Principate. Furthermore, participants in the class should be able to analyse the major events discussed within the course and should have formed their own opinions concerning when the Republic fell, and if this can be dated to one specific event, or was a gradual process.

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Elementary Latin (615-LT1-AB)

This course examines the Latin language in its classical form.  This involves the study of grammar, vocabulary, and etymology.  The language is placed in context via references to Roman history and civilisation.

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History of Latin America (330-258-AB)

This course studies the history of Latin America from 300 C.E. to 21st-century events.  We start with the pre-conquest Maya, Inca, and Aztec.  Then, with the European conquest in 1492, we examine the colonial origins of Spanish, Portuguese, and French-speaking nations.  European, African, Asian, and indigenous cultures blended in new ways.  With Independence in 1810, common issues emerged: nationalism, poverty, revolution, dictatorship, indigenous rights, popular music, literature, and nationalistic art. Country highlights include Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Cuba, and Haiti. 

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Russian History (330-910-RE)

The course will examine the main events in Russian and Soviet history from Kievan Rus’ to the collapse ofthe Soviet Union. A study of Russian/Soviet history will provide the students with an understanding of a civilisation which spanned Europe and Asia. The following topics will be covered: Kievan Rus, the Mongol conquest, the rise of Muscovy, Imperial Russia, the Russian Revolutions of 1917, the Civil War, the New Economic Policy, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the Cold War,the Khrushchev era, the era of Stagnation, the era of Glasnost and Perestroika and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

 

Faculty

Emmanuelle Carle

Office: HO 224
Local: 5168
Email: emmanuelle.carle@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Julien Charest

Office: HO 119
Local: 5983
Email: julien.charest@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Catherine Humes

Office: HO 113
Local: 5817
Email: catherine.humes@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Andre Leblanc

Office: HS 131
Local: 5062
Email: andre.leblanc@johnabbott.qc.ca

André LeBlanc began his university studies in the sciences, taking a B.Sc. in biology and psychology at the University of New Brunswick in 1990. He went on to do his Master’s (1993) and PhD (2000) at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto.

After completing his PhD, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en science et technologie at the Université du Québec à Montréal (2000-2002) and in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University (2002-2003). In 2004 he moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he taught for three years as a visiting assistant professor in the History of Science and Technology Programme at the University of King’s College.  In 2010, he spent a month teaching as a visiting professor in the Master en Histoire et Philosophie des Sciences at the University of Bordeaux and has been teaching a seminar on the Historical, Philosophical, and Social Aspects of Science at the Science College of Concordia University since 2011.

Professor LeBlanc joined HEPS in January 2008 and has been happily teaching history, research methods, and the history and methodology of science ever since. He has published in the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, History of Science, Scientia Canadensis, and the Human Nature Review. His research interests include the nature of the placebo effect, the relationship between science and religion, the role of mind in evolution, and the problem of free will from the perspective of science.

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Edward Osowski

Office: HO 129
Local: 5100
Email: edward.osowski@johnabbott.qc.ca

Edward Osowski received his Ph.D. in History from Pennsylvania State University in 2002 with a specialization in Latin American History.  While on a Fulbright scholarship, he conducted archival research on colonial indigenous history in Mexico City and has presented his findings at conferences and seminars at Harvard University, UCLA, the Université de Montréal and other institutions.  Before joining the faculty of John Abbott College in 2006, he taught at McGill University, Concordia University, and the University of Northern Iowa.  In addition to having several publications to his credit, he is co-editor of Mexican History : a Primary Source Reader, forthcoming from Westview Press in 2009.  He brings his love of the history of music, myths, and ideas to the courses that he teaches at John Abbott College and believes that students new to history have the ability to do the rigorous work of interpretation, writing, and discussion.  

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Tanya Rowell-Katzemba

Office: H 327
Local: 5918
Email: tanya.rowell-katzemba@johnabbott.qc.ca

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William Russell

Office: HO 224
Local: 5101
Email: bill.russell@johnabbott.qc.ca

Webpage

John Serrati

Office: HO 130
Local: 5992
Email: john.serrati@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Peter Solonyszyj

Office: HO 127
Local: 5102
Email: Please use MIO

I was born in Montréal in 1956 and have spent most of my life here. Both my parents were born it what is today the Ukraine, and came to Canada in 1952 by way of Germany and England.  I graduated from Concordia University with a B.A. (Honours History) and later completed a Masters Degree in History, also at Concordia.  I have been teaching at John Abbott College since 1989.  My particular field of interest is the social and economic history of Canada and the United States, with particular emphasis on the impact of immigration.  Recently, I have been trying to integrate new scientific scholarship into my teaching of history. 

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Minko Sotiron

Office: HO 224
Local: 5994
Email: minko.sotiron@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Fiona Tomaszewski

Office: HO 123
Local: 5717
Email: fiona.tomaszewski@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Jessica Vandervort

Office: HS 131
Local: 5978
Email: jessica.vandervort@johnabbott.qc.ca

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James Vanstone (Chair)

Office: HO 131
Local: 5486
Email: jamesvanstone@johnabbott.qc.ca

James (Jim) Vanstone was born and raised in Windsor, Ontario. While majoring in History and Philosophy at the University of Windsor, Jim was elected President of the history society called the Lord Acton Club. Graduating with an Honours B.A. and the University’s gold medal in history Jim went to Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario majoring in “Imperial”, now more popularly called Third World history. He obtained his M.A. (1967) and Ph.D. (1974) from Queen’s. While in Graduate School Jim was a tutor, a graduate assistant and also the editor of the Graduate Review. Doing research for his Ph.D. in Southern Africa Jim was awarded two Canada Council scholarships. Jim and Bev, his wife, spent a year in Africa and some time at England’s Oxford University’s New College completing the research. Returning to Queen’s, Jim taught Imperial History for one year before going to John Abbott College in Ste. Anne de Bellevue where he is teaching history and chairing, for the last fourteen years, the History, Classics, Economics and Political Science Department.

Jim was elected a member of the Academic Council of the college in 1974 and elected Chairperson in 1975 being re-elected Chairperson by faculty, administration, students, professionals and support staff every year down to the present time. As Chairperson he is ex-officio member of all council committees but takes an active and leadership role in the development of curriculum including the reforms transforming the college from a cafeteria-style approach to one of programs and competency based education. He serves on the Academic Programs Committee, which developed the college’s Institutional Policy on the Evaluation of Student Achievement (IPESA).

Each year, since 1975, the faculty has elected Jim, Chairperson of the Faculty Professional Development Committee. It has a mandate and a budget to assist professors become better teachers. From 1979-1985 Jim was elected to serve on the college’s Board of Governors and for four of those years was a member of the Executive of the Board.

Outside of the college, Jim served as a teacher and, for seven years, Superintendent of Ste. Genevieve United Church Sunday School.  He is an Elder of his church and served for five years as Chairperson of the Official Board. At the present time, he is the pastoral charge’s lay representative to Montreal Presbytery of the United Church and had the distinct honour to be elected Chairperson of Montreal Presbytery from 2000 to 2002 responsible for the oversight of sixty pastoral charges. In 2007 Jim was the President of the Montreal and Ottawa Conference of the United Church of Canada. At the Annual Meeting of the M & O Conference he presided over the ordination of ten United Church ministers. Jim is also a member of the Board of Governors of the United Theological College of McGill University and has recently been appointed Vice-Chairperson of the Montreal School of Theology of McGill University.

Jim is a member of the Masonic Order and was Master of Meridian Royal Alexandra Lodge #125 in 2001-2002. He is a Shriner and a member of the Karnak Shrine Greeters Unit picking up children from the airport and transporting them to the Shrine Hospital in Montreal. He is the current Deputy Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Quebec.

All this being said, Jim remains the devoted husband of Beverley, father of Catherine and Christopher and the doting grandfather of Olivia (11), Matthew (6), and Victoria (4). Jim is blest to have the grandchildren a ten-minute walk away and is actively involved, on a daily basis, in their lives. Education, public service, family are the watchwords of Jim Vanstone’s life.

How To

Footnotes/endnotes (Chicago Style)

Bibliography (Chicago Style)

Economics

What is Economics?

Economics is the study of how people produce, consume, trade, save and invest for the purpose of satisfying their needs. It is about how we organize ourselves in the form of households, firms, markets, public and private institutions and government organizations from the local to the global level to carry out these activities in the most efficient and mutually beneficial manner. It is about how human societies have used science and technology, entrepreneurship and innovation, competition and regulation and applied it toward the betterment of our every day life and the elevation of living standards. It is about strategic thinking and analytical decision-making, how to make the most rational allocation of scarce resources against multiple and competing ends to maximize individual and societal wellbeing. In short, it is the study of human survival, the story of human civilization. Economics is a social science that focuses on group behaviour as it applies to economic activity.

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Why Study Economics?

Economics is the field that helps us understand what products are produced, in what quantities they are produced, in what way they are produced and at what price they are sold. It helps us understand how markets work, what role they play and why individual freedom and competition are so vital to the well being of the average person and the community at large. It helps us understand why some occupations are better paid than others and why some people earn more than others. More specifically, it helps us understand why prices change, why interest rates and exchange rates rise and fall, why new jobs are created or lost, why we export and import, save and invest, why the economy goes up or down. Understanding of economics makes us better and smarter consumers, helps us earn more money and helps us keep the money we earn. It also makes us better citizens, because it helps us separate facts from myths, truth from fiction and helps us support government policies that benefit us while opposing policies that harm us. It helps make us be analytical instead of emotional voters. It helps us ask the right questions and demand value for our tax dollars.

Any student who is interested in how the world works, including all social science students, cannot fully and accurately comprehend the world unless they have some basic knowledge of economics. For those students interested in pursuing careers in commerce or business administration or management, remember this: these fields, whether marketing or finance, international business or accounting, are all applications of economics! Economics provides you with the complete overview and fundamentals of all these fields in commerce and business administration. Management is another word for decision-making, for allocating, for making rational choices which maximize benefits and minimize opportunity costs. For those students interested in the environment, no field, whether in the social or biological sciences better helps understand why we pollute and what we can do to minimize pollution and reduce our footprint on the earth’s biosphere.

For those students who are interested in pursuing their studies in economics, economics provides the most diverse range of highly paid career options in the social sciences, from academic to business, private to public, agriculture to finance and consulting. For a more detailed description of career options in economics see Careers in Economics. To see how economists are paid, compared to other occupations, see Earnings by Occupation. But studying economics alone is not sufficient. The student also needs to study political science and history, anthropology, psychology and sociology to get a complete view of social science. The HEPS Department at John Abbott is one of the few in Canada that brings at least three of these leading disciplines under a single integrated banner.

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Courses

Macroeconomics: Introduction to Economics

This course familiarizes students with important concepts such as the determination of gross domestic product, unemployment rate, consumer price index, business cycles, creation of money and balance of payments. Fiscal and monetary policies are examined within the context of the Canadian economy. Topics dealing with international trade and finance in relation to the Canadian experience are also discussed.

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Microeconomics: Introduction to Economics

This course acquaints students with the basic principles of microeconomics such as consumer theory, demand and supply, elasticity, production and costs, market structure and behavior, and the determination of factor incomes. Contemporary topics such as the environment, urban issues and government intervention in the market are discussed. Required course for the Commerce profile.

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Money and Banking

A continuation of Macroeconomics, Money & Banking involves a more detailed analysis of the money supplyy, commercial banking system, non-bank financial intermediaries and the functions and operations of the Bank of Canada. A more advanced Macroeconomic model is developed to give students greater insight into the workings of the Canadian economy. Economic policy is discussed in relation to current developments in Canadian and world economies. This course fulfills the additional Commerce level 2 course requirements.

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International Economic Relations

A continuation of Macroeconomics, this course examines the theory of international trade, effects of tariffs and trade barriers, political economy of trade policy, balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, exchange rate determination, international investment and capital flows, currency regimes, the international monetary system, the role of global institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the World Trade Organization (WTO), G8 and G20. Special topics such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), economic integration and regional trading blocks, the European Union (EU), Canada’s trade policy, the rise of China and India and globalization and its impact on our world are also discussed.

 

Faculty

David Desjardins

Office: HO 130
Local: 5878
Email: david.desjardins@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Cheryl Jenkins

Office: HO 131
Local: 5104
Email: cher@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Ken Matziorinis

Office: HO 110
Local: 5109
Email: ken.matziorinis@johnabbott.qc.ca

Kenneth (Kyriakos) Matziorinis holds a B.A. degree in Honours Economics & Political Science from McGill University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Economics from McGill University. He is also a Certified Management Consultant (CMC).

His research interests have been tax incentives for capital investment, the theory of expansion and replacement investment, capital-output specificity and the impact of changes in the composition of output on capital investment, the role of expectations in consumer and investment spending, the economies of Greece and Southeastern Europe, the political economy of the international monetary system and the economic history of the ancient world from Classical Greece, through the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.

He has taught at John Abbott since 1981 and he also teaches at McGill’s Centre for Continuing Education at the graduate management program where he has been a two-time recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award (1993, 2006). He has also taught courses at Concordia University, and for the University of Toronto.

He is the author of three textbooks that are used in his courses: 
Introduction to Macroeconomics, An Applied Approach, 5th Ed. Canbek Publications, 2007
Introduction to Microeconomics, A Managerial Approach, 3rd Ed. Canbek Publications, 2006
Business Economics, In Theory and Practice, 4th Ed., Canbek Publications, 2006

For more information read his Curriculum Vitae.

http://www.canbekeconomics.com

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Thierry Neubert

Office: HO 112
Local: 5110
Email: neubertt@johnabbott.qc.ca

Thierry holds a B.Sc. from McGill (maths, physics and psychology).  At the age of 26 he discovered Economics and has done all of the course work and Comprehensive Exams for his PhD at McGill.  Officially, he is known as an "ABD" (all but dissertation).  Maybe one day he will complete his thesis.  In the meanwhile, he has written two textbooks that are used and appreciated by his students:

Macroeconomics:  Theory and Applications, 2011 edition, Neubert Consultant
Microeconomics:  Theory and Applications, 2011 edition, Neubert Consultant

He has been teaching at John Abbott since 1983 and has also taught Macro- and Micro-economics at McGill (MacDonald campus).  In 2012, he became coordinator of the Honours Social Science Program. His particular area of interest is how economic theory applies in the real world so as to make it easier for his students to understand the subject. He also enjoys reading history and he believes that to be a complete economist you must also study Anthropology, Political Science, History, Psychology and Sociology as these subjects provide important insights into human behaviour.  He has also done research on carcinogens in the workplace and the impact of part-time work on student academic performance.  He  found that most students can handle up to 15 hours a week without it adversely affecting their grades.  Beyond that, there is a marked deterioration in their marks.

Though originally French from France, he spent 15 years of his childhood in the Far East, 11 of these in Hong Kong, and is therefore a product of the British school system.  He has seen much of the world and in the mid-70s travelled for two years through Europe and the Middle East with just $2000 in his wallet (lots of hitch-hiking and sleeping on rooftops or in fields...).  He is an avid athlete (tennis, soccer, swimming, running) and has run several marathons (Boston and Montreal).  He and his wife of over 30 years, Cheri, have also done a lot of bicycle touring in France, Austria, and Vermont.  They have two children.

Outside of John Abbott, Thierry has been very involved in his children's school, developing the after-school program of the primary school between 1997-2001.  He then created the school's  Foundation and was its first president (2003-2009).  Since 2006 he has also organised annual class reunions attracting about 200 alumnae each year, some in their late 70s.  He was also a member of the Parents' Association (1996-2008) and sat on the school's Board of Directors (2005-2009).  With the former, he launched an electronic version of the parents' newspaper and was its co-editor-in-chief.

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Noelle Palmer

Office: H 420B
Local: 5022
Email: noelle.palmer@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Charles Reid

Office: HO 113
Local: 5487
Email: cwreid@johnabbott.qc.ca

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June Riley

Office: HO 117
Local: 5103
Email: jriley@johnabbott.qc.ca

Professor Riley joined John Abbott College in September 1991.  Her professional career as a financial economist includes work in forecasting currencies and interest rates in the investment banking industry in Toronto as well as teaching in a variety of college and university programs.  Her current teaching interests include Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Quantitative Methods and Integration of the Social Sciences.

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Avinash Samboo

Office: H 433
Local: 5630
Email: avinash.samboo@johnabbott.qc.ca

Avinash S. Samboo holds a B.Sc. (Hons) and Ph.D. in Economics from University of Mauritius, Mauritius. He also studied at Georgia State University, USA and at University of Nottingham, U.K. as a Commonwealth Research scholar.

His research interests have been in Public Finance and Welfare Economics and Political Economy with specific focus on the modeling of the social security budget in a welfare state. His other interests include Growth Theories and Labor Economics. He was also involved on various projects sponsored by United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and African Economic Research Consortium (AERC).

He has been teaching at John Abbott College since August 2006. He has also taught at University of Mauritius, University of Technology, Mauritius and Georgia State University, USA.

Courses at John Abbott College:
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Economics II (Introduction to International Economics)
Quantitative Methods
Research Methods

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Bertram Somers

Office: HO 115
Local: 5105
Email: bertram.somers@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Useful Economics Links

 

Political Science

Courses

Modern Political Ideas

This course provides a basic introduction to the political ideologies of the left, center and right – from communism, socialism, liberalism and conservatism to fascism. It also examines the development of these ideologies, focusing on how these ideologies inspire political movements such as antiglobalism and environmentalism.

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International Politics

This course introduces students to the world of international politics. Topics include the methods of studying global politics, war, conflict management, diplomacy, international law, international terrorism, human rights, global ecopolitics and international organizations such as the United Nations, NATO and the International Court of Justice.

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Political Ideologies and Regimes

This introductory course in comparative politics examines the basic theories and methods that are used to understand the diverse political systems that exist in the 21st century. It includes a framework for the comparison of the political structures, processes and ideological background of states around the world such as Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China and Japan.

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Canadian Politics

This course introduces students to the political challenges that determine the dynamics of Quebec and Canadian politics, focusing on Canadian federalism: the tug of war between federal and  provincial governments. Topics include Quebec nationalism, the parliamentary system of  government, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the judicial system and other aspects of the political process, including political parties, elections, interest groups, political leadership and ideologies.

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Faculty

Christophe Chowanietz

Office: HO 125
Local: 5717
Email: christophe.chowanietz@johnabbott.qc.ca

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Lynda Gelston

Office: HO 129
Local: 5816
Email: lynda.gelston@johnabbott.qc.ca

Lynda Gelston teaches political science and research methods at John Abbott College.   She graduated with a Double Honours in Political Sociology from Concordia University and was supported by an SSHRC scholarship to complete her M.A. in Political Economy at the University of Toronto.

With about thirty years of teaching experience, Lynda enjoys developing instructional material and hosting active learning simulations in her political science classrooms.  She is a faculty advisor for a John Abbott College student club, the Model United Nations, where students compete and host conferences of re-enacted historical and literary gatherings.

 Just underway, Lynda is busy constructing a website for social science research with the Centre collégial de développement de matériel didactique (CCDMD).  Up to a dozen people from pedagogical specialists, animators to media-wizards are helping her to do what she likes best – generating useful pedagogical material for students.

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